Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Pankaj Mishra reviews ‘We Were Eight Years in Power’ by Ta-Nehisi Coates · LRB 22 February 2018

Conservatives and socialists should like Pankaj Mishra reviews ‘We Were Eight Years in Power’ by Ta-Nehisi Coates for its damning account of the Obama years and its take on Coates' facile analysis of racism. I particularly liked this paragraph:
As early as 1935, W.E.B. Du Bois identified fear and loathing of minorities as a ‘public and psychological wage’ for many whites in American society. More brazenly than his predecessors, Trump linked the misfortunes of the ‘white working class’ to Chinese cheats, Mexican rapists and treacherous blacks. But racism, Du Bois knew, was not just an ugly or deep-rooted prejudice periodically mobilised by opportunistic politicians and defused by social liberalism: it was a widely legitimated way of ordering social and economic life, with skin colour only one way of creating degrading hierarchies. Convinced that the presumption of inequality and discrimination underpinned the making of the modern world, Du Bois placed his American experience of racial subjection in a broad international context. Remarkably, all the major black writers and activists of the Atlantic West, from C.L.R. James to Stuart Hall, followed him in this move from the local to the global. Transcending the parochial idioms of their national cultures, they analysed the way in which the processes of capital accumulation and racial domination had become inseparable early in the history of the modern world; the way race emerged as an ideologically flexible category for defining the dangerously lawless civilisational other – black Africans yesterday, Muslims and Hispanics today. The realisation that economic conditions and religion were as much markers of difference as skin colour made Nina Simone, Mohammed Ali and Malcolm X, among others, connect their own aspirations to decolonisation movements in India, Liberia, Ghana, Vietnam, South Africa and Palestine. Martin Luther King absorbed from Gandhi not only the tactic of non-violent protest but also a comprehensive critique of modern imperialism. ‘The Black revolution,’ he argued, much to the dismay of his white liberal supporters, ‘is much more than a struggle for the rights of Negroes.’

Tuesday, January 30, 2018

The Panthers Can’t Save Us Now

The Panthers Can’t Save Us Now:
At the heart of contemporary organizing is the notion of black exceptionalism. Contemporary Black Lives Matter activists and supporters insist on the uniqueness of the black predicament and on the need for race-specific remedies. “Black Lives Matter is an ideological and political intervention in a world where Black lives are systematically and intentionally targeted for demise,” #BlackLivesMatter co-founder Alicia Garza explains. “It is an affirmation of Black folks’ contributions to this society, our humanity and our resistance in the face of deadly oppression.”1 “When we say black lives matter,” Garza continues, “we are talking about the ways in which Black people are deprived of our basic human rights and dignity. It is an acknowledgement [that] Black poverty and genocide [are] state violence.” This essay takes aim at this notion of black exceptionalism and lays out its origins and limits as an analysis of hyperpolicing and, more generally, as an effective political orientation capable of building the popular power needed to end the policing crisis.

Sexual Victimization by Women Is More Common Than Previously Known - Scientific American

Sexual Victimization by Women Is More Common Than Previously Known - Scientific American

Monday, December 18, 2017

Glenn Loury & John McWhorter on Ta-Nehisi Coates



03:09 Critiquing Ta-Nehisi Coates's new book 10:55 Will the bubble burst on race-centric thinking? 15:00 John pulls no punches on Coates’s writing 24:12 The case for hope over pessimism in the black community 31:35 Glenn: The Jim Crow era is over

Sunday, December 10, 2017

FAQ: Paul Nungesser and Emma Sulkowicz, aka "Mattress Girl"

The Nungesser Filed Complaint includes Facebook messages that Sulkowicz agrees are accurate. Her charge against him is that they initiated consensual sex, but then he choked her and anally raped her. Their messages before they had sex do not explain why he might have thought she would want to be choked, a form of "rough sex" or "breath play" that some people enjoy, but they do explain why he might have thought she had consented to anal sex:
Emma: Fuck me in the butt
Paul: ehm
maybe not?
jk
I miss your face tho
Emma: hahahah
you don't miss my lopsided ass?
Paul: I do.
just not that much
good I am actually too tired to choose a movie
*god
also too tired to spell apparently
ETA: The complaint also notes facts about his other accusers:
38. In an effort to bolster her ease, and driven by her feelings of rejection and interest in making a public impact and statement, Emma approached several women with whom she was friendly, encouraging them to each report Paul to the University for sexual misconduct. Two women acquiesced.

39. The first, Jane Doe #1, who was also a member of ADP, filed her complaint against Paul at the end of April or early May 2013, shortly before her graduation. Jane Doe #1 erroneously and wrongfully alleged that a full year prior to her filing (i.e. during the end of her junior year, which was the end of Paul’s freshman year), Paul had grabbed her at a party and tried to kiss her. This allegation was sheer fabrication. Columbia agreed with Paul, ultimately finding him not responsible for the alleged non-consensual sexual contact.*

* Jane Doe #1 later stated, "I wasn’t emotionally scarred or anything. I’m used to people grabbing my ass in bars that’s the shifty state of the world today. Honestly, I didn’t even think it was a reportable offense covered by the misconduct policy." See http.//bwog. com/2Ol4/Ol/23/accessiblepromppt_andequjrab/eanexamjnatjonofsexual
assault-at-columbia/ (Bwog, Jan. 23, 2014)

40. Jane Doe #2, who had been Paul’s girlfriend for several months while they were both freshman (prior to Paul’s sexual intercourse with Emma), was also enticed to file a false report against Paul, alleging sexual misconduct. Jane Doe #2 reported that she had the impression while Paul was her boyfriend, that she could only see him if she had sex with him, and thus she felt obligated to have sex with him. She never alleged physical coercion, violence, or rape. She filed her complaint at the same time as Jane Doe #1. Columbia found a lack of sufficient information to indicate that reasonable suspicion exists of any alleged intimate partner violence and thus terminated Jane Doe # 2’s investigation without any need for a hearing
Recommended: Columbia University rape controversy - Wikipedia

Did ‘Mattress Girl’ Tell the Truth?  Not Very Likely | Minding The Campus

Discredited, the Legend of Mattress Girl Just Won't Go Away - Reason.com 

Saturday, November 4, 2017

How whiteness studies are made meaningless

"The study of whiteness has its origins in a rich scholarly tradition that includes the work of W.E.B. Du Bois, Theodore Allen, Noel Ignatiev, and David Roediger. These writers all explore, in great detail, the intricately imbricated relationship between whiteness and labor in the U.S. But by the time it reaches most of our classrooms and almost all anti-racist training, it has been cleansed of its politics, history and class consciousness and devolved into a privilege walk or a list in Peggy McIntosh’s knapsack. ... Pointing in the abstract toward White privilege shorn from its origins in labor history tends to lead White listeners from the privileged economic classes to unproductive guilt and smug lectures directed toward other, less enlightened White people." —Bill Lyne

from The Ways of White Folks: A Love Letter to the National Education Association